2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Dec 06, 2022  
2021-2022 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Advanced Manufacturing

  
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    ADMA 115 - Microcomputer Applications in Technology


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: None
    Description: Fundamental computer literacy skills for manufacturing in a Windows environment. Productivity software applications such as word processing, spreadsheets, OneNote, Microsoft Teams, Skype for Business, Access database and PowerPoint with an emphasis on organizing, accessing, managing and presenting data for personal and professional communication. Applications are applied to Gantt charts, return on investments calculations (ROI), critical path tasks, gated processing, lean manufacturing, quality control reports, inspection reports, and maintaining an engineering notebook. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    ADMA 135 - Manufacturing Technology and Society


    (2 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: ADMA 115  
    Description: Manufacturing Technology and Society is an overview of the development and design of technical systems in society, their impact throughout history, and procedures for making choices of appropriate technology to apply currently and in the future, based on global awareness and strong moral and ethical standards. Topics of discussion include the agricultural revolution, industrial revolution, information revolution and the forces that brought them into existence and their downfalls. Lab activities and possibly visitations utilized to reinforce concepts. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    ADMA 160 - Metallic Materials and Manufacturing Processes


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: ADMA 115 
    Description: This course is an overview of the selection, nondestructive testing, procedures, processing and application of metallic materials providing manufacturing-based solutions. Supporting topics to be covered in this course include the fundamentals of industrial safety, OSHA, lockout/tagout, finishing products and quality control. Lab activities, demonstrations and visitations may be utilized to reinforce concepts. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    ADMA 230 - Applied Analog and Digital Electronics


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: ADMA 115  
    Description: This course is an introduction to analog and digital electronics as it relates to advanced manufacturing through hands-on activities centered around building and logically troubleshooting circuits and devices. The concepts and theories are covered in an industrial and/or an advanced manufacturing setting. Use of instrumentation is stressed with the application of problem-solving techniques. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    ADMA 240 - Computer Assisted Drawing


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: None
    Description: Computer Assisted Drawing is a basic course in computer-aided drawing, which integrates with manufacturing and automation. Content stresses learning major CAD commands and using the graphic user interface. Conceptual drawings, 2D drawings, 3D drawings, and spatial relationships are explored. Additional topics include file maintenance, printing formats, plotting and 3D printing are used to create two and three-dimensional design models. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    ADMA 298 - Project I


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: SEMR 200 , an approved learning contract, permission of the Office of Experiential Programs, designation of an appropriate academic advisor, and a minimum of 40 earned semester hours
    Description: This first project in the student’s experiential program challenges the student to identify, investigate and analyze a particular topic in the program of study or a concentration. A key objective is to apply skills, methods, and knowledge obtained in prior courses with independent thinking and research; the final product represents the successful and purposeful application of knowledge. The project is undertaken with the close mentorship of a faculty member, and may involve a community partner. Projects can involve scientific-based research or laboratory experiences, needs analysis or development plans for external organizations, or market studies and business plan proposals. Offered As needed.
  
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    ADMA 310 - Basics of Manufacturing Simulation


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: None
    Description: This course is the application of sophisticated computer simulation software for analysis of manufacturing operations, procedures and processes. The course includes an overview of server-based and cloud-computing applications to permit secure data sharing and collaborations in company partnerships. Team and individual projects with utilizing manufacturing simulation and data management applications will be applied and presented. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    ADMA 323 - Computer Assisted Product Design and Rapid Prototyping


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: ADMA 240 
    Description: This course is based on, and not limited to, applied product design and rapid prototyping techniques. An introduction to the application of the cradle-to-grave engineering model will be used to design or redesign industrial solutions. The use of hand tools, 3D printers and equipment will be applied to quickly produce mockups of the developed solution and its presentation. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    ADMA 338 - Non-Metallic Materials and Processing


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: None
    Description: This course is an overview of the types of non-metallic materials, selection, destructive testing, processing and application of non-metallic materials including and not limited to natural, laminated, plastic, compounds and fluids provided through industrial based solutions. Lab activities, demonstrations and visitations may be utilized to reinforce concepts. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    ADMA 340 - Digitally Enhanced Manufacturing


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor
    Description: The Digitally Enhanced Manufacturing course is an overview of the development design and application of the Internet of things (IoT) and Augmented Reality (AR) for manufacturing. IoT areas of study include data from products delivering data back to the manufacturer, their impact to date, and procedures for making choices of appropriate development and application of the technology as it applies currently and, in the future, based on global awareness and strong moral and ethical standards. AR for manufacturing will include the process needed to augment reality integrating hardware and software into a product that enhances industrial processes as explicit directions for executing a process and/or enhancing processes to provide a safer process execution. General topics of discussion for IoT and AR will include historical application of the technologies and procedures, current applications and procedures, developing processes, techniques and analysis. Lab activities and possibly visitations will be utilized to reinforce concepts. Offered As needed.
  
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    ADMA 342 - Industrial Networking and Cybersecurity


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor
    Description: The Industrial Networking and Cybersecurity course is an overview of the development of industrial networks and the methods available to secure the networks. The areas of study in industrial networking include an introduction to computer networks, physical layer cabling with twisted pair and fiber optics and wireless networking and their related hardware’s. The areas of study in industrial cybersecurity include industrial control systems, insecure be inheritance, anatomy of ICS attacks, industrial control system risk assessments, the Purdue Model, the Defense-in-depth model, physical ICS security, ICS network security, ICS computer security, ICS application security, ICS device security and ICS cybersecurity program development. Offered As needed.
  
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    ADMA 345 - Designing and Rapid Prototyping with Solid Modeling


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: ADMA 323 
    Description: Designing and Rapid Prototyping with Solid Modeling with parametric technology includes rapid prototyping, technical sketching, product design processes and the components/variables of good design are applied. Utilizing CAD solids modeling software to create part models and assemblies will be covered. Product designs are designed and analyzed for manufacturability, performance, and potential for profitability for a company. Oral presentations, patent searches and prototype development will be assigned and completed. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    ADMA 350 - Additive Manufacturing


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor
    Description: Additive manufacturing is the formalized term for what used to be called rapid prototyping and 3D Printing. This emerging technology is said to create a paradigm shift in methods and pace of production. In this course, basic principles and development of additive manufacturing, generalized process chain, photopolymerization, powder bed fusion, extrusion-based processes, material jetting, sheet lamination and directed energy deposition processes, direct write technologies, low cost systems, process selection guidelines, post processing and software issues, direct digital manufacturing, design for additive manufacturing, rapid tooling, applications, and future directions of the method will be covered. Offered as needed.
  
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    ADMA 360 - Subtractive Manufacturing


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor
    Description: The Subtractive Manufacturing course is a deep dive into the programming and use of the vertical milling machine and the lathe for preparation for certification on Mazak machines. The areas of study in subtractive manufacturing include Machine coordinate and programming coordinate systems, familiarization with Mazatrol functions and program creation, topics on turning, manual programming, topics on milling, multi-mode, line machining, tool data and tool file, virtual machining, machine simulation and arbitrary shapes. Offered as needed.
  
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    ADMA 362 - Nano Fabrication


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor
    Description: This course is an overview of the broad spectrum of processing approaches involved in “top down”, “bottom up”, and hybrid nanofabrication. The majority of the course details a step by step description of the equipment, facilities processes and process flow used in today’s device and structure fabrication. The student will be introduced to processing and manufacturing concerns such as safety, process control, contamination, yield, and processing interaction. The student will design process flows for micro- and nano-scale systems. The student will learn the similarities and differences in “top down” and “bottom up” equipment and process flows by undertaking hands-on processing. This hands-on overview exposure covers basic nanofabrication processes including deposition, etching, and pattern transfer. Offered as needed.
  
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    ADMA 365 - Internship


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: SEMR 200  or permission, an approved learning contract, permission of Office of Experiential Programs, designation of an appropriate academic advisor, and a site supervisor
    Description: An internship allows the student to put theory into practice. The student applies classroom experiences to the workplace at an off-site placement, where ideas are tested and competencies and skills are developed. Throughout the internship, the student works regularly with a faculty supervisor, the Office of Experiential Programs, and a site supervisor who guides the learning process. The student integrates the collective observations, analyses, and reflections of the experiential team into an internship portfolio that showcases the accomplishments of the experience. The unique portfolio is constructed throughout the internship, and represents the evolutionary and dynamic nature of the learning process. Offered As needed.
  
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    ADMA 370 - CAD/CAM and Industrial Robotics


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: None
    Corequisite: ADMA 345 
    Description: This course is the conversion of CAD resources into NC machine code for the production of metallic and non-metallic products while integrated with industrial robots. Industrial robots will be introduced with hands-on programming of industrial robots and include tasks such as welding, palletizing, placement, finishing and robot integration into advanced manufacturing facilities. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    ADMA 390 - Independent Study


    (1 to 4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: Minimum of 60 earned semester hours
    Description: This course is designed for the student who demonstrates an interest in an area of study not offered or who wishes to pursue a discipline in greater depth than possible through existing courses. An independent study counts as an elective and may not be used for accelerated or remedial credit. A learning contract between the student and instructor defines the responsibilities of the parties and specifies the learning objectives and standards for successful completion of the project. A calendar of meeting times and deadlines shall be a part of that contract. Offered As needed.
  
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    ADMA 410 - Application of CAD/CAM and Industrial Robotics


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: ADMA 370 
    Description: This course furthers the investigation into automation systems dealing with automated manufacturing practices in CNC machines, PLC’s, vision systems, RFID and industrial robotics. Activities include automated handling and processing of materials using conveyors, positioners/work-holders and industrial robots. Computer Integrated Manufacturing techniques including technologies such as sensing, vision, automated product identification, storage and retrieval are covered. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    ADMA 420 - Advanced Manufacturing


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: ADMA 410 
    Description: This course in an introduction to advanced manufacturing techniques including setup and use of current and advanced material processing machines and devices, includes 5 axis milling, laser cutting, water knife utilization, EDM processing, digitation and multiple 3D printing experiences. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    ADMA 430 - Programmable Logic Controllers and Integrations


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: ADMA 230 
    Description: This course is the application of a combination of digital and analog logic technologies that will lay down a framework from which programmable logic controllers are programmed. The concepts of inputs, outputs, relay logic and ladder logic are addressed. Industrial robots and automated devices will be introduced, on-line as well as pendent programming, to include tasks such as pick and place, finish application and device integration. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    ADMA 455 - Manufacturing Automation Systems (CIM/FMS)


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: ADMA 420 
    Description: This course is the approach of using computers to control the entire production process utilizing closed-loop control processes, based on real-time input from scenarios. The student will totally complete the digitization of manufacturing scenarios into advanced manufacturing scenarios in this course by including the application of CAD/CAM techniques. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    ADMA 465 - Simulation of Systems and Integrations


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: ADMA 310 
    Description: This course is the application of sophisticated computer simulation software for a complete analysis of manufacturing operations and processes for a cradle to grave evaluation. Ground up individual and team projects utilizing simulation software, active data collection and storage to refine the manufacturing process that is controlled while providing and implementing efficiencies. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    ADMA 480 - Application of Advanced Manufacturing


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: None
    Description: This course is the application of the completed advanced manufacturing suite of resources, which will be applied to solve several different manufacturing issues/projects provided by manufacturing experts. The cradle to grave experience documents the project and then delivered in professional presentations and papers. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    ADMA 498 - Project II


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: ADMA 298 , an approved learning contract, permission of the Office of Experiential Programs, designation of an appropriate academic advisor
    Description: This project must be in the student’s program of study or concentration(s). It should demonstrate application of the skills, methods, and knowledge of the discipline to solve a problem or answer a question representative of the type to be encountered in the student’s profession. As with Project I, this is undertaken with the close mentorship of a faculty member, and may involve a community partner. The ideal project has a clear purpose that builds directly upon the learning that occurs within the student’s first project and internship. Offered As needed.

Analytics

  
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    ANLY 400 - Analytics Tools and Techniques


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: MATH 280  
    Description: The use of analytics is a common practice in modern business settings. This course introduces the basic concept and practice of analytics and its role in business. The emphasis is on the tools and techniques of analytics with case studies and examples. Topics include: data querying and reporting; data access and management; data cleansing; statistical programming; data mining introduction; relational databases; and, statistical analysis of databases. The student is also introduced to Business Intelligence (BI) and statistical methodology (i.e. clustering, decision tree, etc.) along with using popular analytics packages such as SAS, Google Analytics, Business Objects, Aginity, and others. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    ANLY 405 - Predictive Modeling


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: ANLY 400  and MATH 380  
    Description: The development and implementation of models to predict outcomes based on input data is becoming an essential skill in modern enterprises. The objective of this course is to teach this skill. The course covers the principles of qualitative as well as quantitative models that can be used for predicting outcome based on input data. The predictions may be definitive, based on the assumptions or estimates based on probabilities. The student explores how to prepare input data, build predictive models, and assess the models by examining the output produced. Topics include: exploratory data analysis, linear regression, multiple linear regression, regression diagnostics, logistics regression, analysis of variance (ANOVA), time series and forecasting, statistical methods for process improvement, classifiers, and nonlinear models. General concepts behind how software packages roll up and how they screen data and produce risk scores on topics such as in-patient probability of readmissions. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    ANLY 415 - Advanced Analytics and Reporting


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: ANLY 400  and ANLY 405  
    Description: The student is introduced to deterministic and stochastic decision tools used by leading corporations and applied researchers. The student utilizes these tools to solve complex, real-world problems, building on the basic theoretical understanding of optimization, simulation and predictive modeling obtained in prerequisite courses. The student works with commercial decision modeling programs such as Premium Solver professional (linear, integer and non-linear optimization), TreePlan (decision-trees), Crystal Ball (simulation), and OptQuest (optimization under uncertainty). Throughout the course, the importance of outside-the-model considerations, model limitations, and sources of modeling error are stressed while general frameworks for approaching particular problem types are developed. Offered Spring Semester, annually.

Biology

  
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    BIOL 102 - General Biology


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: None
    Corequisite: BIOL 103  
    Description: This course introduces the student to the major themes of biology, including properties of living organisms, comparison of eucaryotes vs. prokaryotes, patterns of inheritance, the central dogma, mitosis and meiosis, the diversity of life in both plants and animals, classification of organisms, evolution, metabolism, photosynthesis, cell structures, basic structure of the body, infectious disease, the Hardy-Weinberg principle, biodiversity, ecosystems, and the biosphere. A broad understanding of biology and living organisms in the biosphere is developed through hands-on, multimodal engaged learning opportunities in both the classroom and the companion laboratory component. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Fall and Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BIOL 103 - General Biology Laboratory


    (1 semester hour)
    Prerequisites: None
    Corequisite: BIOL 102  
    Description: Companion laboratory component that demonstrates the major themes of biology presented in BIOL 102 . Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Fall and Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BIOL 210 - Introduction to Bioinformatics


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: MATH 120  and BIOL 102 -BIOL 103  or BTEC 170 
    Description: Developing automated ways to deal with vast quantities of scientific information is an essential part of modern research. Bioinformatics aims to link scant pieces of seemingly unrelated information. This discipline seeds the very origins of new lines of scientific research investigations. Bioinformatics is shaping many research disciplines from genetics and molecular biology through to drug discovery, computer science, and even entomology. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BIOL 214 - Anatomy and Physiology I


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 102 -BIOL 103  
    Description: This course discusses the structural and functional makeup of the human body. Medical and anatomical terminology is mastered, and an emphasis is placed on covering the details of development, histology and functioning of the muscular, circulatory, cardiovascular and endocrine systems. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    BIOL 215 - Anatomy and Physiology II


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 214  
    Description: This course studies the immune system, lymphatic system, gastrointestinal tract and digestion, genitourinary system, and the nervous system. An in-depth examination of the five senses is also conducted. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BIOL 225 - Entomology


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 102 -BIOL 103 
    Description: This course introduces the biology, ecology and evolution of insects in both naturalistic and human contexts. Subject matter and course content includes field observation and collection techniques in addition to case studies of evolutionary, economical and historical importance. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Summer Semester, even-numbered years.
  
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    BIOL 281 - Cell Biology Lecture


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: C or higher in BIOL 102 -BIOL 103  
    Corequisite: BIOL 282  
    Description: This course examines the foundations of cell biology including the structure, function, differentiation, and growth of the eukaryotic cell. It is primarily concerned with eukaryotic cells from their evolution, organization, differentiation and biosynthesis. The simplicity and complexity of macromolecules in the cell are covered through multi-modal learning technologies on nutrition, energy production, and synthesis of cellular components. The student develops a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying mitosis and meiosis, the cell cycle, and cancer. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Fall and Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BIOL 282 - Cell Biology Laboratory


    (1 semester hour)
    Prerequisites: C or higher in BIOL 102 -BIOL 103  
    Corequisite: BIOL 281  
    Description: Companion laboratory component that examines the foundations of cell biology including the structure, function, differentiation, and growth of the eukaryotic cell. It is primarily concerned with eukaryotic cells from their evolution, organization, differentiation and biosynthesis. The simplicity and complexity of macromolecules in the cell are covered through multi-modal learning technologies on nutrition, energy production, and synthesis of cellular components. The student develops a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying mitosis and meiosis, the cell cycle, and cancer. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Fall and Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BIOL 302 - Principles of Ecology


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 102 -BIOL 103  or permission of instructor
    Description: This course examines theories (including a variety of mathematical, verbal, and graphical models of important ecological processes), techniques of study (both laboratory and field-based), and natural history. The student explores: 1) various questions (in a broad sense) asked by ecologists; 2) ideas (theories, models) from which hypotheses are suggested to answer the questions; and 3) ways in which ecologists go about gathering data to refute or support the proposed hypotheses. Specific ecological studies are used to illustrate what has been learned about the natural world. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    BIOL 305 - Evolution


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 102 -BIOL 103 
    Description: This course reviews evidence for evolution prior to Darwin’s seminal work and follows through to modern neo-Darwinist concepts. Natural selection, phenotypic and genotypic variation, population biology, extinction, and speciation are covered. The student examines mechanisms of evolutionary change. Material looks at different scales and perspectives from molecular to ecological, generational changes in populations, as well as observable patterns over millennia. Offered Spring Semester, odd-numbered years.
  
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    BIOL 320 - Genetics


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 281 -BIOL 282  and CHEM 151 -CHEM 152 , or BS-Nursing Major, or permission of instructor
    Description: This course is an introduction to human and population genetics including Mendelian and non-Mendelian genetics (DNA replication, transcription, and translation; genetic recombination and mutation), genetic basis of gender (sex-linked and non-sex linked genetic diseases), and emerging areas of genetics research. The student connects facts together to get a whole picture, to apply knowledge, then to solve a problem. Basic genetics introduces the student to the traditional elements of genetic biology and contemporary genetic topics. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BIOL 330 - Microbiology


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 281 -BIOL 282  and CHEM 151 -CHEM 152  
    Description: This course is an introduction to microbial cell structure, growth and physiology combined with basic laboratory techniques. The relationship between host and parasite is emphasized, especially as related to human disease, epidemiology and infection control. A broad range of infectious diseases are covered, including etiologic agent identification, modes of transmission and prevention. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Fall and Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BIOL 370 - Molecular Biology


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 281 -BIOL 282  and CHEM 151 -CHEM 152 
    Description: The complicated process that goes on in living cells and organisms, in terms of the law of chemistry and physics, is described. The genetic message is examined, as it is carried in the form of DNA through transcription and translation as well as the biosynthesis of macromolecules. The course is designed to follow chemistry (general and organic) and biology coursework to complete an understanding of life chemistry. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    BIOL 375 - Immunology


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 281 -BIOL 282  
    Description: This advanced course explores the specific innate and acquired aspects of the immune system. Innate host defenses, which protect humans against disease and foreign contaminants, are examined. Cellular immune response interaction with viral infections, foreign cells, or defective host cells are covered as to how the humoral immune response produces antibodies against foreign antigen and how these immune responses are controlled. Through an understanding of the nature of antibodies, lymphokines and specific cellular reaction, the student discovers the power and limitation of the immune system. This course also includes a significant laboratory component focusing on the analysis of blood cells, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), blood typing, and rapid commercial test technologies. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered as needed.
  
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    BIOL 380 - Special Topics in Biology


    (1 to 4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and academic advisor
    Description: This course covers topics in biology. It is an in-depth study of a selected specialized area of biology and the content varies by semester. Due to the nature of evolving topics, this course may not be eligible for repeat.  Offered As needed.

Biotechnology

  
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    BTEC 100 - Nanobiotechnology Explorations


    (2 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: None
    Description: This is an introductory course to nanobiotechnology, which is the use of existing elements of natural systems to develop new technologies. The concepts of how nano-structures are characterized are defined and a review is conducted of the applications of this new technology. The course includes a laboratory component in addition to lecture component. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 101 - Exploring Biotechnology Through Food, Science, and Cooking


    (2 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: None
    Description: This course provides an overview of basic science and technology through the lens of food and cooking. The student explores the importance of biology, physics, and chemistry in creating food flavor, texture, aroma, and consistency. Visiting chefs explain techniques used to create food products in the kitchen while the student engages in interactive, experiential learning activities to understand the related scientific principles. The student is also being introduced to scientific methods used to evaluate food products. Offered Summer Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 102 - Exploring Nanobiotechnology


    (1 to 2 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: None
    Description: Nanobiotechnology is a STEM field gaining significance as the next industrial revolution due to its diversely applied nature with career opportunities for high-paying jobs. This course aims at introduction of Nanobiotechnology, which is the use of very small natural (DNA and protein-based) and man-made structures to develop new and innovative technologies. The course allows the student to learn the unique concepts and applications of nanostructures in various fields of life spanning medicine, pharma, food, environment, biomedical devices, and many more. The course includes several cool hands-on activities to reinforce the concepts. The student works on a small class project that involves a small paper and a presentation. Limited to the Dual Enrollment student. Offered Summer Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 103 - Food Biotechnology - Farm to Fork


    (1 semester hour)
    Prerequisites: None
    Description: This course focuses on the role of biotechnology in Food and Ag industry. Probiotic yogurts, nutritionally enriched crops, drought and pest resistant plants, intelligent packaging, and processed food - all involve biotechnology processes. The student will learn the structure and function of DNA and its applications. The class will cover the many methods DNA can be altered to create genetically modified organisms (GMOs)/products. The student will discuss the use of GMOs in today’s society focusing on the pros and cons primarily in Ag-Food industry. This class also includes several labs for the student to review biotechnology applications as they create food products such as cheese and yogurt. The course also allows the student to explore various ways biotechnology creates efficient and advanced Ag/food products. Limited to the Dual Enrollment Student. Offered Summer Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 104 - Special Topics


    (1 to 2 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: Based on topic(s) covered or permission of instructor
    Description: This course covers topics in biotechnology. Due to the nature of evolving topics, this course may not be eligible for repeat. Limited to the Dual Enrollment student.  Offered As needed.
  
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    BTEC 105 - The Art of Genes and Fusion


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: None
    Description: The student is introduced to molecular concepts regarding DNA, genes, proteins, and chromosome mapping to describe the importance of biotechnology to help combat human diseases and disorders. The student examines links between diseases and genes, such as leukemia and cancer. Lastly, the student will use case studies and contemporary topics in biotechnology and genetic engineering to understand the significance of gene manipulation in technology development. Offered As needed.
  
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    BTEC 106 - Emerging Medical Biotechnologies


    (1 semester hour)
    Prerequisites: None
    Description: Healthcare is getting revolutionized due to new medical biotechnologies. These are rapidly changing healthcare practices. Novel methods for Diagnostics and Medical Imaging now allow detection of Cancer in very early stages, even before the symptoms appear. Biomedical devices such as Blood Glucose monitoring systems or insulin patches have helped millions. Prosthetics and other biomedical devices are being redefined with new looks and mind-boggling functionalities. Pharma companies are buzzing with development of new drugs, novel drug packaging, targeted drug delivery, and so on. Regenerative medicine and Tissue Engineering are making significant progress as well. This course introduces the student to cellular concepts, biotechnology basics, and their role in development of various medical biotechnologies. Limited to the Dual Enrollment Student. Offered Summer Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 107 - Special Topics in Biotechnology


    (1 to 3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: None
    Description: This course covers emerging topics in biotechnology. It is an in-depth study of a selected specialized area of biotechnology and the content varies by semester. Offered As needed.
  
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    BTEC 110 - Medical Terminology


    (1 semester hour)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 102 /BIOL 103  or High School Biology or permission of instructor 
    Description: This course is designed as an introduction to the nomenclature used by various medical and dental professionals. The course focuses on learning techniques that will enable the student to easily understand medical terminology. Cross-listed with INSC 110 . Offered As needed.
  
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    BTEC 170 - Introduction to Biotechnology


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 102 -BIOL 103  (or taken concurrently) or BTEC 105  or High School Biology or permission of instructor
    Description: Biotechnology explores biological processes to produce raw materials, foodstuffs, and medical treatments for use by humans. The industry is key for generating income worldwide and feeds into the pharmaceutical, textile, food and agricultural industries. The course centers on three main goals: 1) to understand the biological processes involved in biotechnology methods; 2) to identify and criticize the benefits and drawbacks of current methods; and 3) to review new emerging technologies that focus on ecological solutions. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 200 - Introduction to Quality and Food Safety


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: None
    Description: Overview of quality and food safety spanning all segments of the food industry. Topics include: meat, dairy, poultry, confectionary, and bakery segments including allied industry involvement. Offered As needed.
  
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    BTEC 210 - Food and Nutrition


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 170  or permission of instructor 
    Description: This course provides an overview of the diet and nutritional requirements of protein, energy, whole grains, major vitamins and minerals and other food groups that are determinants of health and diseases in human populations. The sources, recommended intake, role of major nutrients, and metabolism are explored, in addition to case studies that address the impact of nutrition on human growth and development of chronic or acute diseases (i.e. cancer, diabetes, heart disease, etc.). Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 220 - Applied Nanobiotechnology


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 100  or permission of instructor
    Description: This course addresses applications of nanobiotechnology for various fields such as medicine, drug-delivery, food and environment. The student explores how various nanostructures can be “functionalized” to perform targeted interactions. The need, application, limitations, and ethical positions for these topics are covered through a multimodal approach of lecture, lab, presentations, group discussions and interactive modules. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 222 - Emerging Laboratory Techniques


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 170  or permission of instructor
    Description: This course covers the planning, execution and implementation of experimental design, the first step toward independent research. The problem areas covered center primarily on abstract principles that are difficult to convey in the standard lecture format. Accordingly, this course is laboratory intensive with visual and hands-on experiments used to reinforce concepts. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered As needed.
  
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    BTEC 235 - Applied Cell and Agro Culture


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 170  or permission of instructor 
    Description: The fields of biology, biochemistry, molecular biology and biotechnology are increasingly dependent on growing and experimenting with cells in culture. This course offers a concise, practical guide to the basic essentials of the techniques used in a modern cell culture laboratory. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Spring Semester, even-numbered years.
  
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    BTEC 240 - Techniques for Biomolecular Research


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 170  or permission of instructor  
    Description: This course gives an in-depth, hands-on experience to fundamental laboratory techniques applied to bio-molecular research to the student in life sciences. The Biotech (life science in general) industry heavily depends on ability for use of these techniques for extraction, purification and characterization of biomolecules (proteins, a variety of types) using several bioanalytical techniques. This course allows the student to get a “life-at-the-bench” experience in application of these techniques. The course covers topics related to successful design of protocols for extraction, purification, characterization, and analysis of structure-function relationship of biomolecules for application in diagnostics, therapeutics, and several industrial applications. It also offers experience in using instrumentation generically used in medical, pharmaceutical, environmental, and other BTEC industries with an introduction to Good Laboratory Practices (GLP). Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 250 - Medical Biotechnologies of 2020


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 170  or permission of instructor
    Description: The field of biotechnology is evolving quickly with innovative technologies. The course covers the concept of biomarkers, its application in diagnostics and therapeutics. Topics such as pharmacogenomics, gene therapy, medical imaging, regenerative medicine, prosthetics, and point of care devices are at the interface of emerging medical technologies and applied biotechnology. This course serves to introduce the student to these emerging trends and technologies in the field of medical biotechnology. Offered Spring Semester, annually, or as needed.
  
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    BTEC 298 - Project I


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: SEMR 200 , an approved learning contract, permission of the Office of Experiential Programs, designation of an appropriate academic advisor, and a minimum of 40 earned semester hours
    Description: This first project in the student’s experiential program challenges the student to identify, investigate and analyze a particular topic in the program of study or a concentration. A key objective is to apply skills, methods, and knowledge obtained in prior courses with independent thinking and research; the final product represents the successful and purposeful application of knowledge. The project is undertaken with the close mentorship of a faculty member, and may involve a community partner. Projects can involve scientific-based research or laboratory experiences, needs analysis or development plans for external organizations, or market studies and business plan proposals. Offered As needed.
  
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    BTEC 311 - Pharmacology I


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 170  or permission of instructor
    Description: This course studies how specific small molecules can impact and affect body behavior and responses. Small molecules or drugs made by man or from nature can modulate special gates and enzymes. These concepts are the first step into the world of pharmacology. The understanding of this course depends heavily on knowing what is considered normal for the body. Consequently, human physiological systems are featured as an integral part of this course. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 320 - Drug Design and Development


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 311  or permission of instructor
    Description: New drug discovery is a long process with soaring costs as the level of scientific complexity increases through research. This course is structured to follow the discovery process and is reliant on outside specialists and speakers. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 340 - Forensic Biotechnology


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 170  or permission of instructor
    Description: This course is designed to introduce the student to the hands-on techniques and opportunities in the field of biotechnology for the forensic field. The course covers topics including introduction to biotechnology, DNA applications in forensic investigation, spectroscopic techniques, molecular biotechnology, and DNA fingerprinting, etc. The course will cover various techniques used in biotechnology (very significant for forensics) such as PCR, DNA immobilization, and DNA diagnostics. There will be field visits, case studies, and group discussions about the latest events in the field of forensic biotechnology. Offered as needed.
  
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    BTEC 350 - Biotechnology Techniques


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 170  or permission of instructor
    Description: This course develops the skills, competencies, and fundamentals of research procedures in biotechnology. The student is exposed to a variety of relevant biotechnology techniques in the laboratory at research or commercial centers. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 351 - Biotechnology Applications


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 350  or permission of instructor
    Description: This laboratory-intensive course examines the various applications in the field of biotechnology at a molecular level, which aids the understanding of cellular mechanisms. The power, limitation, proper use and theoretical framework around biotechnology applications are explored. Biotechnology-related workforce growth, and the area corporations involved in this field, provide case study illustrations. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 355 - Neurology and Biotechnology


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 170  or permission of instructor
    Description: This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the molecular biology and genetic basis of both age-related and injury-induced neurological diseases. Biotechnological research on the molecular mechanisms of neurological pathologies, focusing on unique as well as common mechanisms of age- and injury-related conditions, can lead to emerging diagnostic methods and result in more effective treatments, therapeutic assessments, and strategies for prevention. Offered Spring Semester, Annually.
  
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    BTEC 361 - Food Biotechnology Seminar


    (1 semester hour)
    Prerequisites: Minimum of 60 earned semester hours
    Description: This course reviews advances and applications in the field of food biotechnology. Class activities include primary article reviews, internet research, critiquing of research articles and presentations on topics from food biotechnology such as safety and quality issues with the food industry and applications of food technology in the food safety and quality protocols. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 362 - General Biotechnology Seminar


    (1 semester hour)
    Prerequisites: Minimum of 60 earned semester hours
    Description: This course reviews newsworthy advances and application in the field of biotechnology. Class activities include primary article reviews, internet research, critiquing of research articles and presentations on topics from general biotechnology, such as the ethics of biotechnology. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 363 - Nanobiotechnology Seminar


    (1 semester hour)
    Prerequisites: Minimum of 60 earned semester hours
    Description: This course reviews newsworthy advances and applications in the field of biotechnology. Class activities include primary article reviews, internet research, critiquing of research articles and presentations on topics from nanobiotechnology and its application. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 365 - Internship


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: SEMR 200  or permission, an approved learning contract, permission of Office of Experiential Programs, designation of an appropriate academic advisor, and a site supervisor
    Description: An internship allows the student to put theory into practice. The student applies classroom experiences to the workplace at an off-site placement, where ideas are tested and competencies and skills are developed. Throughout the internship, the student works regularly with a faculty supervisor, the Office of Experiential Programs, and a site supervisor who guide the learning process. The student integrates the collective observations, analyses, and reflections of this experiential team into an internship portfolio that showcases the accomplishments of the experience. The unique portfolio is constructed throughout the internship, and represents the evolutionary and dynamic nature of the learning process. Offered As needed.
  
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    BTEC 370 - Genetically Modified Foods


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 170  or permission of instructor
    Description: This course explores the impact of plant and animal biotechnology on food nutrition and provides an understanding of the techniques and methods in genetically-modified food products. The advantages and disadvantages of genetically modified foods are explored, in addition to cultivation, production, processing, and manufacturing concerns that are related to genetically modified foods. A broad knowledge of the current laws governing use of genetically modified foods, ethical discussions surrounding production of these foods, and the global impact of those laws are studied. Offered Spring Semester, even-numbered years.
  
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    BTEC 371 - Food Science and Technology


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 170  or permission of instructor
    Description: This course explores the fundamental principles of food science including the nature of foods, causes of deterioration, and related advances in technology used in food processing, production, and preservation. The student becomes familiar with the types of micro-organisms that are utilized in the food industry, in addition to the control and prevention of food-borne illnesses through biotechnology and quality-control case studies. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Spring Semester, even-numbered years.
  
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    BTEC 380 - Special Topics in Biotechnology


    (1 to 4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: None
    Description: This course covers emerging topics in biotechnology. It is an in-depth study of a selected specialized area of biotechnology and the content varies by semester. Due to the nature of evolving topics, this course may not be eligible for repeat. Offered As needed.
  
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    BTEC 390 - Independent Study


    (1 to 4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: Minimum of 60 earned semester hours
    Description: This course is designed for the student who demonstrates an interest in an area of study not offered or who wishes to pursue a discipline in greater depth than possible through existing courses. An independent study counts as an elective and may not be used for accelerated or remedial credit. A learning contract between the student and instructor defines the responsibilities of the parties and specifies the learning objectives and standards for successful completion of the project. A calendar of meeting times and deadlines shall be a part of that contract. Offered As needed.
  
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    BTEC 401 - Biosensor Technology


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 100  or permission of instructor
    Description: The course covers aspects such as: what is a biosensor, the types of biosensors, and how to develop a specific assay for a specific detection system. Also covered are the major techniques used in developing and functionalizing nanoparticles for specific biosensor assays. Applications of biosensor technology in medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, bioremediation and quality control in the food industry are reviewed. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 405 - Applied Food Microbiology


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 200 
    Description: This course provides insight into the most recent developments of food-borne pathogens, toxins, and contaminants that may occur in a food production plant environment. The course is delivered in classroom and laboratory environments and includes a mixture of theory, demonstrations, and practical sessions on the fundamentals of food microbiology and food safety. Offered As needed.
  
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    BTEC 411 - Pharmacology II


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 311 
    Description: This course covers how specific small molecules affect body behavior and response. Various areas of pharmacology are explored, with a special focus on the central nervous system. The drugs covered modulate and alter signals that are in turn interpreted by special gates and enzymes, but pathways and control are typically more complex. These concepts mirror those of other disciplines, in particular biochemistry and molecular genetics, and require critical and procedural thought. A primary component of this course is an understanding of what is considered normal for the body. Accordingly, human physiological systems are studied as an integral part of this course. Offered As needed.
  
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    BTEC 420 - Food Safety and Quality Assurance


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 200  or permission of instructor
    Description: This course explores the fundamental principles of food quality assurance and quality control based on the principles of Safe Quality Foods (SQF) and Hazard Critical Control Point (HACCP) planning. The student becomes familiar with the seven HACCP principles for controlling food safety within the food processing, production, and manufacturing environments. In addition, the student is shown basic and advanced principles for safely managing quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) within the food industry. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 435 - Computer-Aided Drug Design


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BIOL 210  or permission of instructor  
    Description: Conducting drug research in a directed and specific manner previously relied on how many small molecules could be tested per unit time. Over recent years, more and more drug design is coordinated with available literature and modern databases containing overwhelming amounts of information. To identify new potential drug molecules, automation has become essential to narrow the field before embarking on a biological screening process. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    BTEC 498 - Project II


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: BTEC 298 , an approved learning contract, permission of the Office of Experiential Programs, designation of an appropriate academic advisor
    Description: This project must be in the student’s program of study or concentration(s). It should demonstrate application of the skills, methods, and knowledge of the discipline to solve a problem or answer a question representative of the type to be encountered in the student’s profession. As with Project I, this is undertaken with the close mentorship of a faculty member, and may involve a community partner. The ideal project has a clear purpose that builds directly upon the learning that occurs within the student’s first project and internship. Offered As needed.

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 151 - General Chemistry I Lecture


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: MATH 120  or MATH 220 
    Corequisite: CHEM 152 
    Description: This course provides a general introduction to atoms and molecules, stoichiometry, states of matter, solutions, reactions, kinetics and equilibrium which serve as a prerequisite for advanced courses. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    CHEM 152 - General Chemistry I Laboratory


    (1 semester hour)
    Prerequisites: MATH 120  or MATH 220 
    Corequisite: CHEM 151 
    Description: Companion laboratory component that illustrates the general introduction to atoms and molecules, stoichiometry, states of matter, solutions, reactions, kinetics and equilibrium which serve as a prerequisite for advanced courses. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    CHEM 161 - General Chemistry II


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: C or higher in CHEM 151 -CHEM 152  
    Corequisite: CHEM 162  
    Description: A study of chemical principles including acid/base chemistry, bonding, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    CHEM 162 - General Chemistry II Laboratory


    (1 semester hour)
    Prerequisites: C or higher in CHEM 151 -CHEM 152  
    Corequisite: CHEM 161  
    Description: Companion laboratory component that illustrates the study of chemical principles including acid/base chemistry, bonding, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    CHEM 200 - Environmental Chemistry I


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: C or higher in CHEM 151 -CHEM 152  
    Description: An introductory investigation of current concerns and problems dealing with chemistry of the environment. Chemistry of the atmosphere, biosphere and hydrosphere are examined and discussed. Offered Fall Semester, even-numbered years.
  
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    CHEM 210 - Organic Chemistry I


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: C or higher in CHEM 161 -CHEM 162  
    Description: This course with laboratory is designed as a first-level introduction to the carbon-based reactions involved in life chemistry. The course focuses on the nomenclature, structure and fundamental basis for reactivity of organic compounds. It sets a background for advanced study in forensic or environmental chemistry and biochemistry. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Fall and Summer Semester, annually.
  
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    CHEM 220 - Organic Chemistry II


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: C or higher in CHEM 210  
    Description: This course builds upon the principles learned in the first course and is designed to provide a foundation in the fundamentals of organic compounds, their structures, reactions, and underlying reaction mechanisms. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Spring and Summer Semester, annually.
  
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    CHEM 310 - Environmental Chemistry II


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: CHEM 200  
    Description: This laboratory-intensive course addresses specific topics related to environmental chemistry; specifically, the transport of chemicals and energy amongst soil, air and water phases, rates of movement of solutes, and the chemical impact to biological systems. This is an advanced course specifically tailored for the student in the integrative sciences program of study or with specific interest in environmental chemistry. This course is required for the environmental chemistry concentration. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered as needed.
  
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    CHEM 315 - Analytical Chemistry


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: CHEM 161 /CHEM 162  and MATH 280 
    Description: This course introduces theoretical and practical aspects of quantitative chemical analysis: primary analysis, error analysis, data handling; solution equilibria and acid-base titrations; spectrophotometry. The laboratory component emphasizes proper analytical techniques. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    CHEM 320 - Bio-Organic Chemistry


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: CHEM 220 
    Description: This course is designed as an advanced undergraduate study of the structure and reactivity of carbon-based bio-molecules. Approximately one-half of the course is devoted to a description of the structure and chemical properties of bio-organic compounds. The second half of the course draws upon the concepts from organic and inorganic chemistry in order to investigate enzymatic reactions and metabolism. Offered Fall Semester, odd-numbered years.
  
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    CHEM 325 - Instrumental Chemical Analysis


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: CHEM 161 -CHEM 162  and MATH 280  
    Description: This course introduces instrumental and method design, function, and operation applied to chemical analysis. The laboratory component emphasizes hands-on instrument use, data analysis, and unknown identification. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    CHEM 330 - Biochemistry I


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: CHEM 210  
    Description: This course is an in-depth study of several classes of biomolecules: proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. The course emphasizes the chemistry that dictates the structure and functions of biological molecules. Particular focus is given to: 1) amino acid and protein chemistry; 2) enzyme activity; and, 3) combination of the major classes of biological molecules to form biological membranes. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Fall Semester, annually.
  
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    CHEM 340 - Forensic Chemistry


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: CHEM 161 -CHEM 162 , MATH 280 
    Description: This course surveys the applications of science in a criminal investigation with a laboratory-based examination of the methods and analyses from a fundamental chemical perspective. Proper evidence sampling methods are introduced. This laboratory intensive course provides the student hands-on analytical experience with solution preparation, techniques for chemical separations of complex samples, preliminary, and/or confirmatory chemical tests for different types of evidence such as documents, fibers, body fluids, hair, and drugs. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Spring Semester, even-numbered years.
  
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    CHEM 350 - Biochemistry II


    (4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: CHEM 330 
    Description: This course is a detailed study of carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism including biochemical thermodynamics. An in-depth study of nucleic acids and how their chemistry dictates their structure and biological function is also presented. Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory per week. Offered Spring Semester, annually.
  
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    CHEM 380 - Special Topics in Chemistry


    (1 to 4 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and academic advisor
    Description: This course covers topics in chemistry. It is an in-depth study of a selected specialized area and the content varies by semester. Due to the nature of evolving topics, this course may not be eligible for repeat. Offered As needed.
  
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    CHEM 420 - Bioinorganic Chemistry


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: CHEM 210 
    Description: This course provides the student an advanced level of understanding of inorganic chemistry and its role in biological molecules. The relationship between structure, bonding, and reactivity of transition metals is discussed with a primary focus on coordination chemistry. Offered Fall Semester, odd-numbered years.

Communication

  
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    COMM 110 - Speech


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: None
    Description: This course builds on the skills acquired in ENGL 105  or ENGL 106 . The student continues to study the process of effective communication, based on an understanding of purpose and audience using speaking techniques such as enunciation and modulation. The student builds an understanding of the basic skills needed to communicate across disciplines. Offered Each semester, annually.
  
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    COMM 225 - Cinema Studies


    (2 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: ENGL 105  or ENGL 106  and GEND 102  
    Description: This survey course investigates major movies, historical events, schools of thought, and developments in the history of film and mass communication. Through readings, lectures, and independent research, the student focuses on the relationships between history, technology, and media development and explores the impact motion media and mass communication have on society and the economy. Cross-listed with GEND 225 . Offered Fall Semester, annually.

Computer and Information Sciences

  
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    CISC 100 - Lego Robotics Programming


    (3 semester hours)
    Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra or equivalent
    Description: This course provides an introduction to mobile robots and the fundamental concepts of programming by using Lego Mindstorms RCX robots. Lectures are followed by hands-on exercises performed in groups, where creativity is a key component. The primary goal is to obtain both visual and textual programming skills while promoting social aptitudes such as leadership and teamwork. Offered Summer Semester, annually.
 

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